Two brothers who make a living messing around in the kitchen inevitably find themselves competing for real estate at a four-burner gas range. Believe us, we’re not stove snobs, we don’t require special “features” or impressive BTUs, and the 265 recipes in our first cookbook (that garnered two James Beard Awards and two IACP awards) were developed on a four-burner Magic Chef that our landlord installed.  So, when we learned about the rare “Town & Country” model produced in the late 1940s by Roper, in Rockford, Illinois, we took note. A full five-feet wide, the stove has four burners over here and another four over yonder, with a sheet-pan-sized aluminum griddle in between. Three oven doors march across the front—one concealing a large broiler—and, in fact, there are three broilers total on this rig. It has the pragmatism of a bicycle built for two, the chrome-plating of a 1950s Cadillac, and the ridiculous bravado of Howard Hughes’ Spruce Goose. We had to find one. After a couple years searching, we located an unrestored example near the Jersey Shore. It had baked many a ziti over the years, according to Fulvio Figliano, who purchased the house and stove from the original own...