DECATUR — Donald Edward (Don) Minton went to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ

DECATUR — Donald Edward (Don) Minton went to be with his Lord and Savior Jesus Christ while surrounded by his family in his home on November 20, 2019, after a courageous battle with cancer. Don was born in May 1931, in Decatur, Illinois, the son of Hildred and Emery Minton. He was baptized and confirmed at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church and was a lifelong member . Don attended and graduated from Decatur High School in 1949. Donald served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War and was honorably discharged. Donald received the United States Service Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, and the Korean Service Ribbon. Upon returning home, he married the love of his life, Frances Wolke, in September 1954. Donald worked as a cabinet maker for a local shop and as a laborer at A.E. Staley Manufacturing Company before launching his career with the Decatur Fire Department on in 1955. In 1961, he was promoted to Lieutenant and then Captain in 1962. During his period as Assistant Chief, he was responsible for training and the firefighting division. In April 1974, he was promoted to Fire Chief. Upon his promotion he stated, “I’m tickled to death, and I will try to live up to the expec...

Way back in the 1980s, Lynn Yaeger started working in the Village Voice’s classified ads department.

Way back in the 1980s, Lynn Yaeger started working in the Village Voice’s classified ads department. It wasn’t long before she was publishing insightful (and often biting) articles about street-level fashions and the politics of dressing. Tonight Yaeger is receiving an award from Council of Fashion Designers of America. Below we’ve included a couple of choice articles and examples of the ways in which Yaeger cast a discerning (and sometimes dissenting) eye over the fashion landscape. Persons evincing even the most cursory interest in the American political scene will find themselves agreeing that this presidential season can be termed the autumn of our collective discontent. It was not always thus. Readers of a certain age can remember the headier polit­ical struggles of yesteryear, when extra-parliamentary parties crowded the tickets, and the talk around town, rather than merely decrying the desultory task of holding one’s nose and flicking a lever for the lesser of two evils, considered the possi­bility of settling disputes at the barricades. But not our task to survey and critique the mainstream candidates as they go pranc­ing around the country de­ceiving the electorate, obf...